Lamentful Miss

In the dark of silence, A dancing angel falls and its wings are snatched away

I will give you another reality

In a world spread in white a strange figure reflects in pain

In a world that was dyed in black, the evil spirits of rivers and mountains (Chimimouryou) got wet in the ecstacy of lies

Smeared in worldliness turning to mourning lementation in the thoughts of blasphemy

In the dark of silence, A dancing angel falls and its wings are snatched away
A sweet scent in exchange for falling into darkness its body snatched away

The many roaming spirits of the night (Hyakiyagyou) fell into an ugly pleasure in a world dyed in black

Smeared in worldliness turning to mourning lementation in the thoughts of blasphemy

In the dark of silence, A dancing angel falls and its wings are snatched away
A sweet scent in exchange for falling into darkness its body snatched away

In the dark of silence, the angel clad in sin if woken up red from the reality of the dream
I was dyed covered in the black memory

----

Annotations

翼 (wings) - Not only can this mean wing/wings, it is also a reference to the Chinese "Wings" constellation (one of the 28 mansions)

異形の姿 (strange figure) -- Other meanings for the kanji used for "strange" are fantastic, grotesque, strange-looking, suspicious-looking

魑魅魍魎 (chimimouryou) -- http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%AD%91%E9%AD%85%E9%AD%8D%E9%AD%8E

There isn't a whole lot I can say about the chimimouryou themselves in literature or legends since I can't find any folklore or even an English explanation online, but after reading the wikipedia page it claims there are many uses for the name/reputation of these spirits. The Chimimouryou can also be looked at as monsters, goblins, demons, phantoms, etc -- it doesn't apply souly to the term "spirit," however "spirit" seems to be the most fitting form of context to describe them. I will get to why later. The terms can apparently be split up - the first two kanji "chimi" litterally translates to "mountain demon". Chimi has the face of a human being but the body of a beast and visits those who lose their way in foresty mountains.

"mouryou" are all kinds of spirits and goblins. They are not limited to area -- in fact they are considered spirits of the deceased that live in mountains, rivers, rocks, and trees. They bewitch people from energy produced in nature. They are said to eat the dead. They have an infant or child-like resemblance, they walk on two feet and their skin is black and red. Their eyes are red, they have long ears, their hair is beautiful and their voices resemble that of a human.

Derivation:
People often refer to them in many cases as a way to describe an "unclean world/society".
It is sort of like a comparison to problems/corruptions of the world. for example -- the political world, financial circles, the world of show business, bullying and teasing, problems that are never resolved in schools, etc. A phrase commonly used with Chimimouryou is "chimimouryou no ga chouryoubakko" which litterally translates to "The Chimimouryou are running rampant"

lementation in the thoughts of blasphemy:
Kanji used for thought - 想い - can also mean the following words: thought, mind, heart, feelings, emotion, sentiment, love, affection, desire, wish, hope, expectation, imagination, experience
Kanji used for blasphemy - 冒涜 - can also mean the following - blasphemy, curse, profanity, sacrilege, desecration

its body snatched away:
the kanji for body - 体 - can also mean "health"

Smeared in wordliness: The kanji for worldliness - 俗悪 - is also in reference to vulgarity and courseness

The many roaming spirits of the night:
My own personal interpretation for a word that doesn't have a true English description. Its a Japanese story or narrative usually presented on stage as well as a parade, generally performed late at night in towns. Its about mass groups of loitering spirits, demons, and ghosts. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%99%BE%E9%AC%BC%E5%A4%9C%E8%A1%8C